Chocolatier Brett Roy

Brett got his first exposure to working with chocolate as a young chef at the Conrad Hilton resort on the Gold Coast of Australia, where he grew up. There he apprenticed under some of the finest chefs and pastry chefs in the world. Later in his career, he decided to take his love of chocolate seriously and pursue the specialized training he needed to truly master the art of making high-quality chocolates and confections.

He trained in Quebec and throughout the United States before spending time over the past few years at Valrhona’s Grand Chocolate school in France. Brett has earned Valrhona’s coveted Expert Chocolatier designation and was named one of the Top 10 Chocolatiers in North America by the Dessert Professional panel in New York in 2015.  His chocolate creations have taken home more than a dozen international medals at the International Chocolate Awards hosted in London England.  He has a real passion for improving what he does every day, which takes him around the globe to train with experts and artists.

Don Fortunato (far right) harvest Pure Nacional cocoa pods on his family farm in Peru.

Don Fortunato (far right) harvest Pure Nacional cocoa pods on his family farm in Peru.

One of the chocolates we're proud to feature and which we've won awards with internationally, is Pure Nacional from Peru. We have exclusive access to this chocolate in our region and we're part of a very small community of chocolatiers that work with this rare chocolate.

The DNA of Pure Nacional is extremely rare. Until the early 20th century, Nacional, a member of the Forastero family, one of the three main genetic categories of cacao, was widely grown in Ecuador, which was then the world’s largest cacao producer. But Nacional succumbed to disease and was thought to be extinct, until a small number of trees were found growing on Don Fortunato’s farm in Peru at an altitude above 3,500 feet, which is rare as well because cacao rarely grows above 2,000 feet. The chocolate is intense, with a floral aroma and a persistent mellow richness. Its lack of bitterness is remarkable.

The Nacional cacao has an unusual and precious characteristic: some of the beans are white, not the usual purple, which produces a more smooth-tasting, less acidic chocolate. It's believed that the white beans are mutations that happen when trees are left undisturbed for hundreds of years.

There aren’t many of these trees on the farm, and it requires a rare chocolate longitudinal conch in Switzerland, created in 1879, to turn these delicate beans into fine chocolate. Which is why chocolate made from 100 percent white beans is extremely expensive and very hard to find.  Only a few chocolatiers world-wide have access to it.  

If you haven't tried Pure Nacional yet, you really should treat yourself.  It's an incredible chocolate experience. 

Don Fortunato harvests his white cacao beans and prepares to lead them out of the farm by burro

Don Fortunato harvests his white cacao beans and prepares to lead them out of the farm by burro


It takes an incredible team from across the globe and close to home to bring you our chocolates.  From our hard-working producers in the cocoa fields and the dairy farmers in Alberta, to the passionate team serving you at the counter. We hope you enjoy the experience.

We’re always looking for great people to join the family.  If you’re passionate and interested in learning more, drop us a note.